Louisiana Redfish

Louisiana Redfish

Redfish are bulldogs and readily eat flies, plugs and other artificial baits. They can be caught year round with September-February being the best months to target them. The mighty Redfish is really why we are all here. Louisiana is the epicenter of Redfish- period these fish consistently top the scales at 30 lbs on fly! The variety of situations you will find these fish in Louisiana is remarkable. 

One of the best sight casting adventures or sporting events alone is stalking and feeding tailing or cruising redfish. Redfish tail in low incoming waters on grass flats as they are “grubbing” for crabs, shrimp and other small baitfish. I love helping clients stalk tailing redfish poling a skiff.  I consistently stay on top of these areas and conditions to make sure we know when and where these ‘freak shows’ will take place. Sometimes there will be groups of up to 100 fish tailing or backing at once or when the water cools they will spread out on the flats. During higher water the fish will get close to the bank which makes for incredible sight casting with high sun.

Redfish are a very honest fish, whereas if the fly is placed in front of them they will readily pounce on it and give us one of the best fights a shallow water species has to offer. “IF IT MOVES IT DIES” thats a cool fish- these large bulls are almost curious about the skiff and man if they barked right before they ate the fly it wold not be surprising given their aggressive nature. Louisiana Redfish are able to be taken on several different types of conventional tackle as well during tuff weather.  I look forward to showing you a great fishery!

Black Drum

Black Drum

Black Drum also know as Swamp Donkeys! are pretty amazing fish and pretty big fish that eat little flies. They can been seen tailing on the edge or floating off the edge waiting to hammer any shrimp or crab pattern available. They fight light giant anchors and are one of the coolest pictures with this gulf dinosaur laid across your lap! These fish will have a white glow when you see them in the water column and want a fly just falling in front of them and with quickly vacuum it up! These are most guides favorite fish of all time on tuff days- they will put up with many ‘bad’ cast and not spook of very easily- I have made several cast at these fish with them only to eat a dangling fly on the 9th or 10th attempt. They are very forgiving for us anglers and guides on challenging days. They like deep water access and can be seen floating off the edges of deeper bayou- perfect on some super low tides in the winter when they are around oyster edges. Black Drum can be caught on fly up to 50lbs and live 40 years. This fish does not exists with this behavior anywhere on the planet…very special! 

Sheepshead

Sheepshead

Sheepshead also known as the Cajun Permit are not the largest fish we target in the marsh but can be the biggest challenge at times. These fish will be found tailing in the grass or cruising on the edges and with a delicate presentation will hammer any small crab or shrimp pattern. These fish are super cool to look at with their human like teeth and can get up to 8lbs plus here in the marsh! These fish don’t get enough credit with their permit style attitude- the presentation must be cast past them and brought into their line of sight. Sheepshead are probably the only fish we can “trout set” and get away with! I can consistently find groups of these fish tailing on the gulf edge and is a sight to see. It is amazing how these creatures were created with zebra stripes- not the most camouflaged species out there. On overcast days these fish can still be targeted with their “jailhouse” uniforms. It is great to dedicate some time to these super cool fish!

Monster Jack

The crevalle jack lives in both inshore and offshore habitats, with larger adults preferring deeper waters than juveniles. In the inshore environment, crevalle jack inhabit shallow flats, sandy bays, beaches, sea-grass beds, shallow reef complexes  and lagoons. The species is also known to enter brackish waters, with some individuals known to penetrate far upstream.

These fish will wear anglers out to the point of exhaustion and test all tackle and equipment to the point of breaking. It is a real treat to have these fish in our presence and a great time of year to fish the ocean and the marsh in the same day.

Louisiana Redfish

Louisiana Redfish

Redfish are bulldogs and readily eat flies, plugs and other artificial baits. They can be caught year round with September-February being the best months to target them.

One of the best sight casting adventures or sporting events alone is stalking and feeding tailing or cruising redfish. Redfish tail in low incoming waters on grass flats as they are “grubbing” for crabs, shrimp and other small baitfish. I love helping clients stalk tailing redfish poling a skiff.  I consistently stay on top of these areas and conditions to make sure we know when and where these ‘freak shows’ will take place. Sometimes there will be groups of up to 100 fish tailing or backing at once or when the water cools they will spread out on the flats. During higher water the fish will get close to the bank which makes for incredible sight casting with high sun.

Redfish are a very honest fish, whereas if the fly is placed in front of them they will readily pounce on it and give us one of the best fights a shallow water species has to offer. I look forward to showing you a great fishery!

Black Drum

Black Drum

Black Drum also know as Swamp Donkeys! are pretty amazing fish and pretty big fish that eat little flies. They can been seen tailing on the edge or floating off the edge waiting to hammer andy shrimp or crab pattern available. They fight light giant anchors and are one of the coolest pictures with this gulf dinosaur laid across your lap! These fish will have a white glow when you see them in the water column and want a fly just falling in front of them and with quickly vacuum it up!

Sheepshead

Sheepshead

Sheepshead also known as the Cajun Permit are not the largest fish we target in the marsh but can be the biggest challenge at times. These fish will be found tailing in the grass or cruising on the edges and with a delicate presentation will hammer any small crab or shrimp pattern. These fish are super cool to look at with their human like teeth and can get up to 8lbs plus here in the marsh!

Monster Jack

The crevalle jack lives in both inshore and offshore habitats, with larger adults preferring deeper waters than juveniles. In the inshore environment, crevalle jack inhabit shallow flats, sandy bays, beaches, sea-grass beds, shallow reef complexes  and lagoons. The species is also known to enter brackish waters, with some individuals known to penetrate far upstream.

These fish will wear anglers out to the point of exhaustion and test all tackle and equipment to the point of breaking. It is a real treat to have these fish in our presence and a great time of year to fish the ocean and the marsh in the same day.